Google Glass in the OR and in Medical Education: Becoming a Disruptive Technology


It’s not the first time I say Google Glass can be the biggest hit in medical technology this yeas, and now as the number of good examples is still rising, it’s becoming more and more evident. Here are a few cases and experiments.
Rafael Grossmann, MD, FACS had a pilot project with this team about the use of Google Glass in medical education. Here is his summary:
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Lucien Engelen and his team at REshape created a video that shows what a regular patient-doctor interaction would look like with the Google Glass and what additional features it could add to the process:

Relatris‘s insight:
Some people are scared of Google Glasses, others disguise technologies like these, and still others are fascinated by the possibilities those glasses could bring, and play around to explore the chances and limitations.  It is impressing what is going on, whether the glasses will ever find really useful applications or not. Here are some examples of what people try to do. Find more by googling.

See on scienceroll.com

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Residency programs grapple with use of smart devices

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An estimated 85 percent of residents have smartphones, which they use an average 2.1 hours per day—including for clinical work. While such smart devices as phones and tablets promise advances in medical efficiency and functionality, there may be unintended consequences as well.

Relatris‘s insight:

Read the linked article!!! (we cannot scoop it here as it is a pdf file) It raises several core concerns about how we use mobile devices (we think it also applies for desktop computers on your consultation table) in clinical practice. It not only applies to residents but also to clinicians. Do you watch your computer screen during consultations? How does your patient feel in this situation? It happend to me several times- and it felt very wired and rude…..

“It is important to pause and consider the unintended consequences of the adoption of this technology. For example, there have been multiple reports of medical errors caused by information technology, such as computerized provider order entry and clinical decision support systems
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Because of the increased connectivity of these devices to work colleagues as well as to residents’ personal life, interruptions may increase in both realms. This may result in ‘‘distracted doctoring’’ and increased medical errors.
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From an educational perspective, we have found that providing residents with smartphones makes them, in effect, more global and less local. This combined with increased interruptions can create professionalism issues. A resident may be providing good care for a patient on a distant ward when he responds quickly to a request from a nurse via smartphone or tablet. However, this act may be viewed as rudeness by the patient right in front of the resident.
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Because devices make reaching supervisors easier, residents may defer most decision making to supervisors, with resulting loss of autonomy and learning.
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Tablets and smartphones also increase connections to residents’ personal lives. Recently at our institution, an attending on rounds observed his medical student accessing Facebook while the attending was discussing a recently diagnosed cancer with the patient.

See on www.ama-assn.org

McKesson Specialty Health collaborates with oncologists to develop new oncology-specific iKnowMed Generation 2

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McKesson Specialty Health announced today the launch of iKnowMed Generation 2SM, a powerful web-based electronic health record (EHR) developed in collaboration with oncologists. Drawing upon their daily clinical experiences, more than 200 physicians have come together to help create a system that advances the quality and efficiency of cancer care delivery.

Generation 2 is designed to meet the unique needs of community-based cancer centers and to help physicians and their staff deliver high-quality care while improving patient safety and optimizing practice workflow. […] It is available from any web-enabled device, is optimized for mobile access via tablet or smart phone and allows the sharing of information between all oncology specialties including medical oncologists, radiation oncologists and surgeons. Additionally, iKnowMed Generation 2 includes features such as detailed cancer diagnosis and staging content; an extensive, up-to-date cancer regimen library; flexible documentation options; e-prescribing; automated charge capture functionality and auto-sharing of clinical notes.

Oncologists attending the 2013 ASCO Annual Meeting will be able to see these functionalities firsthand at the ASCO EHR Lab, an event for oncology professionals to research EHR technology and collaborate with leaders in the field of EHR development.

 

Relatris‘s insight:

An updated electronic health record management tool for mobile access and optimized interaction can be tested at ASCO 2013

See on www.mckesson.com

IBM Watson Demo: Oncology Diagnosis and Treatment

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The IBM Watson Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment Adviser demo was created in close collaboration with Memorial Sloan Kettering, one of the world’s preeminent cancer treatment and research institutions. The demo scenario follows the interactions of a hypothetical oncologist and patient as they move through consultations, tests, treatment options, patient preferences and pre-authorization. It showcases IBM Watson’s capabilities in natural language processing, hypothesis generation and evaluation, and machine learning.

Relatris‘s insight:

Fascinating idea- let’s see how far it brings us.

See on www.youtube.com