Apple gets tough on medication dosage apps | mobihealthnews

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This week physician-led medical app review site iMedicalApps pointed out that a number of medical app developers have received rejection notices from Apple because they included medication dosage information in their app, and Apple says it only accepts medical dosage information submitted by the medicine’s manufacturer. […] By stretching this rule to drug dosage information, Apple appears to be taking a more active role in determining whether a medical app is providing trustworthy information. That is a slippery slope and one that will likely require Apple to hire a considerable amount of medical expertise to execute.

Relatris‘s insight:

Yes, it is a slippery slope, but don’t you want a dosage tool that is absolutely sound and save? We need tools we can rely on.

See on mobihealthnews.com

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Doximity: a mobile app changing the way physicians communicate

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As the clinical complexity of cases increases and physicians further specialize and sub-specialize, there are more physicians involved in the care of any one patient. When dispersed across hospitals, it becomes difficult to work as clinical team- ie. sharing information, insight, and proposed treatments with each other. Rather than being limited to the information input in the EHR or sent via a fax machine from the 1950s, physician-information mobile apps are emerging as a new tool for physician-to-physician conversations.

Relatris‘s insight:

Another (HIPPA compliant) communication tool. Clearly, in large countries with different EHR systems in place, such tools have a certain necessity. But is it really helpful to publish one system after the other? For which one a physician should decide who works with multiple colleagues having different systems? In Switzerland, many years ago, physicians implemented their own system, http://hin.ch, for secure and uniform communication. All doctors having the same technology really fascilitates life.

See on viralcommunications.wordpress.com

Study shows only 50 percent of cancer apps actually contain clinical evidence

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In a recent study by Pandey et al in the Journal of Cancer Education, the authors sought to identify mobile applications related to oncology as of July 29, 2011. Results of the study included 77 apps in the final analysis.

Unfortunately, as mentioned earlier, only a quarter of the apps were uploaded by health care agencies. Clinical evidence was noted in slightly over half the apps, and even those created by health care related agencies demonstrated that only 79% had scientific evidence provided.

Relatris‘s insight:

“Clinical evidence was noted in slightly over half the apps”…. This is really an unacceptable status, for clinicians as for patients. There clearly is a high need of quality control in the field of medical apps!

See on www.imedicalapps.com

Residency programs grapple with use of smart devices

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An estimated 85 percent of residents have smartphones, which they use an average 2.1 hours per day—including for clinical work. While such smart devices as phones and tablets promise advances in medical efficiency and functionality, there may be unintended consequences as well.

Relatris‘s insight:

Read the linked article!!! (we cannot scoop it here as it is a pdf file) It raises several core concerns about how we use mobile devices (we think it also applies for desktop computers on your consultation table) in clinical practice. It not only applies to residents but also to clinicians. Do you watch your computer screen during consultations? How does your patient feel in this situation? It happend to me several times- and it felt very wired and rude…..

“It is important to pause and consider the unintended consequences of the adoption of this technology. For example, there have been multiple reports of medical errors caused by information technology, such as computerized provider order entry and clinical decision support systems
[…]
Because of the increased connectivity of these devices to work colleagues as well as to residents’ personal life, interruptions may increase in both realms. This may result in ‘‘distracted doctoring’’ and increased medical errors.
[…]
From an educational perspective, we have found that providing residents with smartphones makes them, in effect, more global and less local. This combined with increased interruptions can create professionalism issues. A resident may be providing good care for a patient on a distant ward when he responds quickly to a request from a nurse via smartphone or tablet. However, this act may be viewed as rudeness by the patient right in front of the resident.
[…]
Because devices make reaching supervisors easier, residents may defer most decision making to supervisors, with resulting loss of autonomy and learning.
[…]
Tablets and smartphones also increase connections to residents’ personal lives. Recently at our institution, an attending on rounds observed his medical student accessing Facebook while the attending was discussing a recently diagnosed cancer with the patient.

See on www.ama-assn.org

HealthTap launches ‘AppRx’ so you can get app recommendations from real doctors

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Health Q&A startup HealthTap has added a new feature to its popular mobile apps called AppRx that lets doctors recommend high-quality medical mobile apps to everyday users.

There are more than 40,000 health and wellness mobile apps available in the iOS and Android app stores and there are a lot of crummy apps out there. For example, there are more than 600 diabetes apps and more than 200 children’s health apps. Having legit doctors tell you which apps you should download and use makes a lot more sense than trying all those out.

Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2013/05/30/healthtap-apprx/#VPIqX8IajB23lVHB.99

Relatris‘s insight:

Some kind of health app curation and definitively a valuable guide for patients in the vast ocean of health apps.

See on venturebeat.com

Mobile Health Apps and Government Regulation: What You Need to Know

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Mobile devices represent an exciting new frontier in patient care. Smartphone apps, such as Parrish Medical Center’s exciting HealthBridge app, help promote healthy behaviors and provide more ready access to medical information. Unlike many aspects of care, however, the mobile health industry is relatively untamed and unregulated. But that’s about to change.

According to ModernHealthcare.com and FierceMobileHealthcare, the FDA will formally issue guidelines on how it intends to regulate mobile health applications.

 

Relatris‘s insight:

Looking at the alarming numbers of apps that do NOT provide correct results (e.g. opiod converting apps as showed earlier on this site or around 50% OF ONCOLOGY APPS  (see our next entry)) it is highly important that there is some control. We can see multiple attemps starting right now, including one of the FDA. Unfortunately, in all the information we could found, the main issue seems to be privacy and which which apps will NOT be regulated.

Fortunately, there are some other initiatives like the Happtique Health App Certification Program:

Apps that meet all of the Technical Standards will then be evaluated for the Content Standards, which will be conducted under the auspices of internationally recognized third party organizations, such as the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and CGFNS International, and performed by clinical specialists selected based on the mobile app’s specific subject matter. Happtique will continue to expand its HACP Content Review Partners and is currently in discussions with a number of organizations with various areas of clinical expertise. http://www.happtique.com/app-certification/

We will introduce more of these control processes and other criticism of the use of medical apps here on this site in the next days.

See on russellherder.com

GE Healthcare Launches #GetFit Cancer Prevention Campaign

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GE Healthcare has today launched its third annual #GetFit (www.ge-getfit.com) global public awareness campaign on cancer prevention.

This award-winning campaign – now in its third year – is expected to reach several million people worldwide. #GetFit encourages participants to share their healthy habits and join in the challenge via social media. For every healthy habit and tip shared using the #GetFit hashtag, players will receive points and rewards that contribute to fuel a global “health-o-meter” – an interface displaying real-time progression related to the number of participants and their activity. New this year, is a web app that has been developed for mobile users to manage their healthy habits on the go.

As part of this year’s #GetFit campaign, several global challenges have been announced: Move Your Body; Eat Healthy and Own Your health. Participants can select their individual challenges, which focus on; sport, and active lifestyle, sun safety, food and nutrition, smoking and alcohol use. At the start of each challenge, participants can watch a short video with information and advice provided in a user-friendly way to guide and encourage participants on how to break bad habits and form healthy ones.

Relatris‘s insight:

Sounds like a calssical gamification showcase. Would be really interesting to survey the impact of the campaign- just PR or real sustainable effect on habits?

See on www.financialpost.com