Augmented Reality iPad App Guides Surgeons During Tumor Removal

A new iPad app from Fraunhofer Institute for Medical Image Computing MEVIS in Germany is using augmented reality technology to help surgeons excise liver tumors without damaging critical vessels within the organ.

A CT scan is performed before the surgery and the imaged vessels are identified within software, all of which is then transferred to the iPad. During the procedure the surgeon can navigate the imaged liver to see where the vessels are, and if the camera is turned on and pointed at the exposed liver the app automatically superimposes the vessel structure of the organ onto the live picture. Notably, the app is not simply a concept, but was already tested successfully during a liver tumor removal at Asklepios Klinik Barmbek in Hamburg.

Relatris‘s insight:

As with many of these innovations, this application first has to proof usability in daily routine- but again the creativity of the new tools developed and the pace of their development is highly fascinating.

See on www.medgadget.com

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Docwise is an app that helps physicians stay up to date on medical journals and news

Docwise is a medical app that aggregates new articles from medical journals and medical news sources.  There are similar applications, such as Read by QxMD and Docphin, but with this app, physicians also have the ability to select their favorite medical news sourcesDocwise is a medical app that aggregates new articles from medical journals and medical news sources.  There are similar applications, such as Read by QxMD and Docphin, but with this app, physicians also have the ability to select their favorite medical news sources such as Medscape.

Relatris‘s insight:

There are quiet some journal aggregator apps available. In this review, Docwise is tested, an aggregator in magazine style that also lets you add news sources. The addition of journals is very handy, and with the exeption of highlighting, all necessary options are available.

See on www.imedicalapps.com

OncoAssist becomes latest app to be classified as a medical device

An iPhone and iPad app that offers oncologists a full range of clinical decision support tools has become the latest mobile application to be classified as a medical device.

OncoAssist is designed to save oncologists time by providing quick and easy access to prognostic tools that can help with decisions on risk stratification and clinical trial.

Relatris‘s insight:

OncoAssist seems to be a very interesting app for oncologists, aggregating a bunch of useful tools from certified sources and seeking approval from authorities. Right now only available (and certified) in the UK and Irland, we are looking forward seeing this app in the Swiss app store. For more information: http://oncoassist.com

For a walkthrough:

See on www.pmlive.com

Survey: 45 percent of smartphone users want online physician appointment booking

The survey asked how interested the respondents were in communicating with healthcare providers or obtaining diagnostic tests through a smartphone or tablet […]

Some 43 percent of respondents were interested in asking doctors questions, another 45 percent were interested in booking appointments, while 42 percent were interested in checking the effects and side effects of a medicine. While the percentage differences between the age groups didn’t vary much, people over the age of 65 were less interested than other age groups. Of the healthcare services listed, the patients were least interested in getting reminders to participate in programs for exercise, diet, weight loss and other wellness programs.

Relatris‘s insight:

About 30% of respondents of the questionnaire like to interact with their physician online and would approve of tools allowing to do so easily. Unfortunately, the article does not state which percentage of total American adults online those respondents represented. Still, an app supporting patient/physician interactions can definitively improve communication, which is especially important with diseases as complex as cancer, enhancing patients trust in doctors and medications.

See on mobihealthnews.com

New Mobile App Assists Oncologists In Navigating Ever-Evolving Sea Of Cancer Information

Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) announced an exclusive sponsorship of MDLinx, a web property of M3 USA, for a searchable mobile application that provides reviews of the latest oncology-specific journal articles.

The journal aggregator app, called MDLinx Oncology Articles, is available for Google Android® and Apple iPhone® platforms and allows users to access the oncology information that is most important to them wherever they may be. Physician editors at MDLinx rank, sort and summarize oncology articles from more than 150 oncology journals, allowing oncologists to not only choose what journals they want to follow and filter by sub-specialty, but also search articles by key term or tumor type. The content is selected and controlled exclusively by the MDLinx Editorial Team at M3.

Relatris‘s insight:

I downloaded this app about two weeks before its official launch and did a small analysis of the publications chosen by the MDLinx team.

The app has a straight-forward, lean, and appealing design with a sponsor screen quickly showing up while the app is starting and a clear and easy to handle journal search/add.

First, I chose 6 journals (BJC, CCR, EJC, IJC, JCO and Lancet Oncology) in the app and compared the articles in the app stream with the TOCs on the journal website. With the exception of Lancet, all articles were “online first” and showed up in the app randomly distributed from the date of online publication up to one week after.

I then analyzed the percentage of main articles published by 4 of those journals (BJC, CCR, JCO and Lancet) that appear in the app stream within this week for the last couple of issues. The number was 70% to nearly 90%, which still leaves you with a high number of articles in your feed.

Last, I compared the articles in the app with those in MDLinx email newsletter for 5 consecutive days for the journals chosen. On 4 of the 5 days, the app suggested more publications than the newsletter (25-45% more), while only few publications showed up in the newsletter but not in the app. The newsletter therefore provides you with a stringer selection of the published articles.

Taken together, the app is an appealing and handy way to get publications-on-the-go, but to enhance the value of the app (especially compared to other journal aggregator apps), I think even more curation is needed- even when now and then, some important information may get lost.

See on www.prnewswire.com

Apple gets tough on medication dosage apps | mobihealthnews

See on Scoop.itoncoTools
This week physician-led medical app review site iMedicalApps pointed out that a number of medical app developers have received rejection notices from Apple because they included medication dosage information in their app, and Apple says it only accepts medical dosage information submitted by the medicine’s manufacturer. […] By stretching this rule to drug dosage information, Apple appears to be taking a more active role in determining whether a medical app is providing trustworthy information. That is a slippery slope and one that will likely require Apple to hire a considerable amount of medical expertise to execute.

Relatris‘s insight:

Yes, it is a slippery slope, but don’t you want a dosage tool that is absolutely sound and save? We need tools we can rely on.

See on mobihealthnews.com

Doximity: a mobile app changing the way physicians communicate

See on Scoop.itoncoTools

As the clinical complexity of cases increases and physicians further specialize and sub-specialize, there are more physicians involved in the care of any one patient. When dispersed across hospitals, it becomes difficult to work as clinical team- ie. sharing information, insight, and proposed treatments with each other. Rather than being limited to the information input in the EHR or sent via a fax machine from the 1950s, physician-information mobile apps are emerging as a new tool for physician-to-physician conversations.

Relatris‘s insight:

Another (HIPPA compliant) communication tool. Clearly, in large countries with different EHR systems in place, such tools have a certain necessity. But is it really helpful to publish one system after the other? For which one a physician should decide who works with multiple colleagues having different systems? In Switzerland, many years ago, physicians implemented their own system, http://hin.ch, for secure and uniform communication. All doctors having the same technology really fascilitates life.

See on viralcommunications.wordpress.com