mHealth: building a mobile companion app for cancer sufferers

Cancer treatment is a very complex and painful process demanding the highest level of accuracy from both physician and patient. And it is also an area where mobile technology can assist with treatment.

Relatris‘s insight:

migrate2mobile is a company supporting their clients to go mobile with their existing products and information. They published a summary of benefits mobile applications can have for cancer patients. While some of these are really supportive (e.g. symptom tracking), others seem to be rather constructed- or which patient really needs to do blood count tracking or units conversion? Still, they list some classical examples where mhealth is useful for both, patients and doctors.

See on migrate2mobile.com

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US government shuts down- affecting clinical trials and research

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) stopped processing grants, some government websites were made inaccessible and many important research programmes were left hanging, potentially putting lives at risk in the case of some disease studies. Use of government telephones and e-mail was also suspended. The restrictions were still in place as Nature went to press.

At the NIH, headquartered in Bethesda, Maryland, 73% of the agency’s 18,646 employees were immediately placed on furlough, or enforced leave. The agency also stopped accepting patients for its clinical trials or initiating new studies. Minimal staff remain to care for lab animals and to protect NIH facilities.

Relatris‘s insight:

I realized how much of the services of the US government I actually use regularly when visiting the PubMed and Clinicaltrial.gov webpages that both aren’t updated anymore. Luckily clinical trials on run at NIH can still be continued. But the halt in both, new trial initiation and NSF research and grant processing, will have a long-term impact.

See on www.nature.com